Techniques


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Techniques

Porcelain art encompasses all the techniques of watercolour and oils and more…..enamels, gold, silver, platinum and lustres, glaze chipping, marbleizing, texture pastes, metallic finishes, airbrushing, pen work, and glass painting to name a few. To master all of the various techniques used in the art of painting on porcelain is a time consuming, challenging and painstaking process but one that offers an end-less range of creative possibilities.


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Techniques

L’Art de la peinture sur la porcelaine embrasse toutes les techniques: de la transparence de l’aquarelle à l’opacité de huile, des techniques tels que dorures, lustres, craquelage de glaçure, marbrerie, pâtes structurelles, travail à la plume, pour n’en nommer que quelques-unes. De chinoiseries de la première période, les objets et les décors proposés par les manufactures se mirent à refléter le goût et la décoration de l’époque.


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Getting Started

The porcelain artist begins by transferring their basic design onto china blanks (blanks are undecorated glazed or unglazed (bisque) porcelain forms).

Blanks manufactured in a multitude of shapes and designs can be purchased from catalogues, general department stores, local studios, or directly from the companies producing them.

Over-glazed paints (special low fire mineral pigments derived from metallic oxides and flux) are applied in several steps. The paints generally supplied in powder form are mixed with oil for painting.   Over-glazed paints are translucent and require numerous kiln firings to approximately 800 degrees celsius to build up the desired colour and effect. In the firing process the colour might change slightly as the glaze softens and the colours bind and become permanent.

Being able to withstand such high temperatures is one reason why painted porcelain pieces are far more likely than canvas paintings to survive the ages.

Copyright © Porcelain Artists of Canada Inc.